Book Review: The Remedy

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The Remedy

There are few business concepts which are applicable across any company in any industry. From solopreneurs to multi-national conglomerates, the principles of Lean Management are a tool to improve the culture of a company.

I recently got the chance to read “The Remedy” by Pascal Dennis, which is a real life story about how lean was applied across a large car manufacturer.

Lean is predominantly known to be a process to decrease waste within manufacturing processes. Through the travels of Tom and his sensei Andy, stories are told on how Lean Management is applied within non-manufacturing settings.  The reader is taken through a journey where common obstacles of dealing with a company that is heavily placed into silos, non-communitive, and insular culture are dealt with. You get the opportunity to see how Lean Management can be applied in the non-manufacturing departments of Human Resources, Marketing, Product Development, and Accounting.

The reader is introduced to many of the basic concepts and terminology of Lean Management (for example the 8 types of waste) in the style where Tom, the plant manager of the shining star of Taylor Motors, is taken from his current role to lead the development and launch of a new car, originally known as the Defiant.

If you want to learn more about Lean Management, this would be an ‘average’ book to pick up. The Japanese terminology is used throughout the book which can make things confusing at time. There are great animations throughout the book, but at times, too many. It gave the feeling that you were reading a Pictionary book at times.

I personally don’t see this book as being a good starting point if you are a novice to Lean Management. Lean is best learnt within a manufacturing setting since the subject matter can be visibly seen. The author previously wrote “Andy & Me” which details the journey of transforming a manufacturing plant towards being Lean. This book would be a good starting point.

Do you have any books about Lean and Lean Management that you recommend?

Have an awesome week.

Kevin

Kevin MacDonald is a Business Consultant at L6S Business Consulting Inc (www.L6SBC.ca). L6S offers services in management consulting, Controller and CFO contracting, and lean management with either project work or teaching/mentoring of staff. Kevin has his CMA accounting designation along with a Black Belt in Lean Six Sigma.

Kevin is active in the community by volunteering for the South Edmonton Business Association, the Fringe Festival, Goodwill Industries of Alberta and donates blood at the Canadian Blood Services.

United, Airlines, Airports, Viral

Volunteering at United

The newest corporate public relations blunder now belongs to United Continental Airlines (United). I am sure that Pepsi is very happy to pass the hat onto another corporate citizen.

What Happened

It is ‘commonly known’, in some circles, that airlines will oversell their flights to ensure that they are full at time of departure. United follows the same practice. This practice came to a head for a flight from Chicago to Louisville on April 10th. United staff asked for 4 people to voluntarily give up their seats to accommodate the airline. 3 people volunteered while the 4th person was violently removed from their seat. From a memo off the desk of the CEO of United, Oscar Munoz, the person was ‘re-accommodated’.

Airlines commonly overbook their flights, for multiple reasons. According to the US Department of Transportation, in 2016, less than 1 in 10,000 were involuntarily bumped from the major US airlines. In 2016, this happened to United passengers at a rate of 0.43 per 10,000. It happened on American Airlines at a rate of 0.64 and at Southwest Airlines to 0.99 persons per 10,000.

Why Did It Happen

Overbooking happens for a number of reasons. None, however, can explain the events that occurred.

Resource Allocation: A flight leaving from Louisville had 4 members of its flight crew in Chicago. This is a reason why 4 seats were required. Did United not have any flight crews in Louisville that they could have used? Are their flight crews centrally located in certain locations or based off flight schedule and needs? Overall, did the schedule of the flight crews have then in the correct place?

Leadership: The CEO of United, Oscar Munoz, sent out a memo to staff after the event blaming the passenger for actions which is not seen in any of the footage that was captured. The CEO mention in the memo that the passenger was violent and belligerent. A properly written memo could have helped the situation but instead, gas was poured on the fire. If an employee of mine treats a customer that way, I would take ownership of the situation right away. It can be assumed that staff were not properly trained. That is a responsibility of the CEO. I understand that it was Chicago Airport Police that removed the person but United staff should have been trained on various methods to help get passengers to volunterily give up their seat. I have seen it happen effectively.

KPIs: United is a publicly traded company. Shareholders are constantly looking at the numbers to see how their investment is performing. Revenue per Available Seat and Passenger Miles Flown are key indicators on the health of an airline. Why does this create overbooking? If there is no passenger in the seat, the miles flown per passenger are negatively affected. When travelling, I have waited more than once for a fellow passenger to board the place. By overbooking, airlines are ensuring that there is a person in every seat.

Sensitivity: Consumers are rarely loyal to a certain airline. They will change airlines to save $5. If you don’t have any loyalty to an airline or are constantly purchasing the cheapest flight possible, you are increasing your chance of getting bumped out of your seat.

Legality: Airlines are allowed to overbook their flights and they are also ALLOWED to remove someone from a plane. In the purchasing contracts of Canadian airlines, however, it does not state how a person could be removed from the plane. Based on this assumption, the acts which happened on United are allowed and legal.

Internet Reaction

As you can imagine, the reaction from the Internet, specifically Twitter, was very fast. Videos of the event were online hours after the event occurred. It is possible that videos were posted even before the plane departed Chicago.

Social Media, Reaction, United, Overbooked

Some reaction from Twitter in regards to the United flight.

Stock Market Reaction

Shareholders of United firstly saw the event in a positive light by bidding up the price of the stock. When reading the headlines, the focus was most probably on the fact that United was overbooking their flights. A great problem for business is to have too many customers. As I am writing this the day after the event, United’s stock price has already decreased by 4%.

Overbooking, United

United’s Stock increase after word of event spread

Operating in the airline industry is not an easy task. There is a high capital investment along with the fact that one of your largest costs, jet fuel and airport fees, are largely controlled by third parties. Overbooking of flights is not something that will stop in the near future. Airlines have lost their sensitivity to consumer demands and views…mostly because consumers have trained them to be that way.  Even after dragging a bleeding and paying customer off one of their planes, United is still flying today and will for some time.

Did you know that airlines commonly overbook their flights? If you were a CEO of airlines, would you look at stopping the overbooking of flights? How would you do it so your financials are not compromised?

Kevin

Kevin MacDonald is a Business Consultant at L6S Business Consulting (www.l6sbc.ca). L6S offers services in management consulting, Controller and CFO contracting, and lean management with either project work or teaching/mentoring of staff. Kevin has his CMA accounting designation along with a Black Belt in Lean Six Sigma.

Kevin is active in the community by volunteering for the South Edmonton Business Assocation, the Fringe Festival, Goodwill Industries of Alberta and donates blood at the Canadian Blood Services.

How Are You Competing – Operational Excellence

excellenceThis is part 1 of 4 blogs which will cover the different customer value propositions that a company can use to compete in the market place.

Every company competes, in one way or another. Either they are competing to get attention with a gorilla marketing strategy or to simply get new customers. Competition is a fundamental part of any marketplace. Unless there is a monopoly or duopoly in place, market forces are moving resources between companies.

The weakest of all modes for competition in business is operational excellence. In the eyes of the consumer, you offer the cheapest product of all solution providers within your space. Your business model is based on maximizing your capacity and selling as much of your product as possible.

There is one Fortune 500 sized company that comes top of mind when you think about a company that is operationally excellent….Walmart. Walmart, in the eyes of the consumer, is the cheap place to go, in general, when you need to buy something. They are not very innovative in their offering. Customer service, well, you have to be able to find someone on their store floor to consider customer service. Lastly, quality products is not something that rings with Walmart.

When you create your company with a business model of being operational excellent, you are more than likely to attract a large portion of consumers. Who doesn’t want to save money?

But in following this model, it becomes hard for your company to raise prices. You have to ensure that you stay top of mind for your consumer when it comes to buying something cheap. But what happens when someone else decreases their prices below yours? Well, if you are tried and true to your strategy, you will decrease your price too. This will only start a race to the bottom. In reflection, you have just commoditized your offering and your consumer will always go to the cheapest name, no matter who it is.

There are some circumstances where being the cheapest in the market is the best position. You may be focused upon an economically sensitive target group which is under served. Perhaps you are entering a new market with a new product and you want to help accelerate adaptation of your offering.

Does your company want to be the cheapest in its industry? What companies do you see fitting that bill?

Have an awesome and productive week.

Kevin

Kevin MacDonald is a Business Consultant at L6S Business Consulting Inc (www.L6SBC.ca). L6S offers services in management consulting, Controller and CFO contracting, and lean management with either project work or teaching/mentoring of staff. Kevin has his CMA accounting designation along with a Black Belt in Lean Six Sigma.

Kevin is active in the community by volunteering for the South Edmonton Business Association, the Fringe Festival, Goodwill Industries of Alberta and donates at the Canadian Blood Services.

For help with your business, contact Kevin at kevin@L6SBC.ca or 780-868-1867. You can also follow Kevin on Twitter at @L6SBC or Facebook.com/L6SBC

Marketing In a Weak Economy

This article was originally published on the BusinessLink’s website.

Small Business Week (Oct 16-22) is an exciting time for entrepreneurs with great events across Canada offering small business owners multiple opportunities to learn and connect. One of the many events that I attended was organized by Business Link named “Ignite Small Business Week YEG: Marketing in this Economy!?”

The highlight of the event was to hear Randy Brososky from the Group of Rogues speak about how companies should market themselves during a period of weaker economic growth. I have heard Randy speak before and I knew that he would bring great knowledge to business owners to help them grow their business.

SOLVE A PROBLEM

When you are looking to market your company and its offering, remember: “To a fish, the universe is water.” In terms of your company, you truthfully have to look at yourself from the viewpoint of your customer. What problem(s) are you solving? Are you making the purchasing process logical or emotional? Are you tying these items together to make it easier for your customer to choose you?

WHAT ARE YOU REALLY SELLING?

Rolls-Royce is well known for selling cars but they also make jet engines. They understand from the view point of their end customer- the more time that a jet can be in the air, the more money airlines make. With that in mind, Rolls-Royce does not ‘sell’ a jet engine; they sell time in the air. They repair their engines for free. The only time that Rolls-Royce charge for their engines is when that engine is flying in the air.

FIVE TIPS FOR MARKETING IN A SLOW ECONOMY

Here’s what marketing guru Randy Brososky shared at the event:

1. CUSTOMER CONNECTION: Stay in touch with your customer but don’t sell to them. By keeping that connection open, when the economy starts to swing upwards, your customer will remember you and go to you first.

2. SHIFT HAPPENS: People shift their spending habits as times change, but are you shifting along with them? 10 years ago, Tim Horton’s coffee could only be bought within their locations. With the shift to home brewing and Keurig cups, Tim Horton’s coffee can now be purchased in grocery stores (or in their locations) in grounded bean format or within Keurig cups.

3. SMART DISCOUNTS: Offer 2 for 1 deals but the deal is only activated after you have involved your customer. For your customer to get a 2 for 1 deal, have them bring a friend. You can also have your customers become brand ambassadors. Offer them discounts when they speak to their community about you.

4. BEAT THE FEAR: Ask your customer what is holding them back from purchasing from you. Hyundai accepted vehicle returns if their customers lost their job during the recession of 2008. They gained market share and saw positive sales growth while other car manufacturers were going bankrupt.

5 NEW VALUE OFFERING: Look at how you can make your customer feel like the centre of the universe. Can you offer a lower cost item to your customer but still solve their problem and fulfill the same emotional desire? Can you sell what you are offering in a different fashion?

Even with a slower economy, companies still do want to increase their top line. At the very least, you can set yourself up for success during the upcoming growth phase by staying in touch with your customer, talking about the value you create, and tapping into your customers’ emotion.

Have an awesome and productive week.

Kevin

Kevin MacDonald is a Business Consultant at L6S Business Consulting Inc (www.L6SBC.ca). L6S offers services in management consulting, Controller and CFO contracting, and lean management with either project work or teaching/mentoring of staff. Kevin has his CMA accounting designation along with a Black Belt in Lean Six Sigma.

Kevin is active in the community by volunteering for the South Edmonton Business Association, the Fringe Festival, and Goodwill Industries of Alberta and donates blood at the Canadian Blood Services.

For help with your business, contact Kevin at kevin@L6SBC.ca or 780-868-1867. You can also follow Kevin on Twitter at @L6SBC or Facebook.com/L6SBC

 

Lose-Lose Relationship

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Everyone in Canada pretty much knows about the latest saga which is currently happening between our federal postal service, Canada Post, and its unionized postal delivery workers. At the time of writing this, the union was holding back from any labour disruptions…for at least a day.

The first labour disruption will involve the union workers not working any overtime hours in Alberta and the North West Territories. This arrangement will slowly roll out across the country. Per a radio interview that I heard, that amounts to just over one hour per week per postal delivery worker. Not a large disruption but it also makes you wonder why they have to work that much overtime over the whole system. That would be the subject for another few blogs since it is a pretty big topic.

I was talking to the postal delivery worker who is in charge of my community postal box last week. To say the least, she is not impressed since she does not know what is going on. As of Friday afternoon, the union had told her that they would be calling all workers Sunday night in regards to their work arrangement for Monday.

In talking to her, she said something that got me thinking. ‘This is a lose-lose situation. We are going to lose income while Canada Post is going to lose clients and revenue”. Currently, Canada Post delivers the last 5 kilometers of a packages’ travels for 66% of online transactions. Online retailers will need to look for alternatives or allow revenue to go to other retailers.

As in the case of many government policies, a labour disruption at Canada Post can be a disruptive event which will cause business to change their operations for long term sustainability.

Would a labour disruption at a postal service affect your company? How would you deal with it?

Have an awesome and productive week.

Kevin

Update as of September 6, 2016: Canada Post and the postal workers have come to a 2 year tentative agreement. Traditionally, they develop a 4 year agreement but the major issues were not fully dealt with. Hopefully, over the next 4 years, Canada Post and its union will be talking about solving their differences.

Update as of September 26, 2016: To my understanding, the vote still hasn’t been called by the union to see if the membership accepts the deal.

Kevin MacDonald is a Business Consultant at L6S Business Consulting Inc (www.L6SBC.ca). L6S offers services in management consulting, Controller and CFO contracting, and lean management with either project work or teaching/mentoring of staff. Kevin has his CMA accounting designation along with a Black Belt in Lean Six Sigma.

Kevin is active in the community by volunteering for different groups and donates platelets at the Canadian Blood Services clinic on a bi-weekly basis.

Kevin is hosting a workshop series known as Entrepreneurial Community Edmonton. The workshops cover different areas of business, including finance, human resources, and collections. You can find more information at http://www.l6sbc.ca/ecyeg.html

For help with your business, contact Kevin at kevin@L6SBC.ca or 780-868-1867. You can also follow Kevin on Twitter at @L6SBC or Facebook.com/L6SBC

Is It Time to Start Now?

Thanks to the BusinessLink for the opportunity to write this blog a few weeks ago. You can find the original posting at:http://businesslink.ca/blog/now-time-start-business

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With the recent developments in the economic landscape, Albertans have experienced significant change. Companies have seen a decrease in sales and are right sizing their operations to be affordable, but yet meet the current demand. More than 70,000 Albertans have been affected by company restructuring and they are looking for their next opportunity.

In many cases, the next opportunity may lie in starting up their own business. But is it the right time? Everyone is cutting back.

A number of strong and vibrant companies started during an economic downturn. Microsoft, FedEx, Hyatt Hotels, and Smashburger are a part of a long list of companies that started during an economic downturn. Here are 5 suggestions on how you can make your startup a success.

Lean and Mean: Seeing that ‘times are tough’, your first priority should be to run your business within a strong and realistic budget. That skill will become valuable in the future.

Innovate: Are you stuck in a pattern of running your business the way you always have? This is the time to re-examine your strategies and processes.

Marketing: For many companies, their first reaction to a slowdown in sales is to cut their marketing budget. Look at this as an opportunity to get your message in front of your target market with less noise from the competition.

Relationships: Spend more time with your current clients and target market. Get to know them on a deeper level. Find out what their pinch points are and reverse engineer them.

Improvement: Listen to your customers and use that knowledge to improve your offerings. Maybe use that information to create a new product line or service offering?

Be realistic! Start a new product line because it is within your budget and it solves a problem for your target market. You have limited resources. Remember when you develop a new product or offering, you are taking resources away from your core product.

An economic downturn is a fruitful time to start up a new venture. This was my perspective when I started my business in the last recession of 2008-09. This is your opportunity to be open to new ways of thinking, and build on what you have.

Have an awesome week.

Kevin MacDonald is a Business Consultant at L6S Business Consulting Inc (L6SBc.ca). L6S offers services in management consulting, Controller & CFO contracting, and lean management with either project work or teaching/mentoring of staff. Kevin has his CMA accounting designation along with a Black Belt in Lean Six Sigma.

Kevin is active in the community by volunteering for different groups and donates platelets at the Canadian Blood Services clinic on a bi-weekly basis.

Kevin is hosting Entrepreneurial Community Edmonton, a series of workshops with the goal of helping business owners/managers with their company. For more information, please visit L6SBC.ca/ecyeg.

For help with your business, contact Kevin at kevin@L6SBC.ca or 780-868-1867. You can also follow Kevin on Twitter at @L6SBC or Facebook.com/L6SBC

Growth & Expansion: Part 1 of 6

Growth 3

Over the next 6 weeks, I will be going over the top 5 reasons why companies are not successful, according to the Small Business Administration of the United States. You will see that there are some common elements to each of the 6. Feel free to look at the original article here.

When someone starts a new full time business venture, in general, they want that venture to earn enough for them to live a comfortable life. When you start from nothing, and you want it to develop into something, growth is needed.

I have seen and heard a number of stats in regards to business and the need for growth. Some people say that if your company is not growing, it is dying. That would have to come with certain parameters. For example, there are not many companies that grow during a recession or an economic depression. The second interesting statement I have heard is that if a company has the same revenue level over a 2 year period, there is an 85% chance that the company will not exist 5 years from now. In other words, your company needs to be able to constantly grow to be able to survive and thrive into the future.

As you can tell, growth is a very important part of a business. Sadly, it is also considered to be the 6th most common reason why a company fails. You might be thinking now, how could a company fail that is growing? Very easily, there is no proper plan or research conducted.

Plan: What is the strategic plan with the new product or service? Who are your competitors? How are you going to differentiate your offering from others that are currently in the market? What is your budget and timeline for future viability of the product?

Research: With a new product or service that you are offering, are you actually fulfilling a market demand? What problem are you solving for the consumer? One reason why growth hurts company because no research is done in terms of the product or service they are offering and the target market. Asking your loved ones or friends does not constitute research.

Resources: Do you have the internal resources to be able to expand with a new product or service? Do you have to hire extra people? What will their skill set be like? How much will it costs to hire those people? Can your business model handle those costs? Do you have the internal capacity to make or deliver the product? Is a capital investment required?

I personally know a local Edmonton firm that underwent a parabolic growth profile. Sadly, their growth was not properly managed. Currently, this firm is letting go staff because their customers, new and old, became very displeased with the services they received. The decrease in revenue is not economically driven. They deliver an essential service and their customers are now spending their dollars with their competitors.

Have you seen growth backfire on a firm? How was it handled?

Have an awesome week.

Kevin

Kevin MacDonald is a Business Consultant at L6S Business Consulting Inc (www.L6SBC.ca). L6S offers services in management consulting, Controller and CFO contracting, and lean management with either project work or teaching/mentoring of staff. Kevin has his CMA accounting designation along with a Black Belt in Lean Six Sigma.

Kevin is active in the community by volunteering for different groups and donates platelets at the Canadian Blood Services clinic on a bi-weekly basis.

For help with your business, contact Kevin at kevin@L6SBC.ca or 780-868-1867

Are the Walls Moving?

Walmart somewhat surprised a number of people last week in closing 269 stores around the globe.[1] For many retailers, this would drastically effect the company but in the case of Walmart, the stores being closed only reflect 1% of total sales and square footage.  The majority of the stores being closed are of the small variety, while Walmart still plans to open over 135 larger format stores within the next fiscal year starting February 1. In total 16,000 people will lose their jobs due to this restructuring.

Seeing that the majority of stores being closed are of the small variety, it can be ascertained that Walmart is looking at decreasing their own internal costs by increasing the retail square foot per employee at a store.

Walmart has developed a poor reputation in numerous communities by driving prices down where local stores can’t compete and paying employees’ minimum wages. In many cases, this has increased the strain on the social services offered by governments. Walmart, somewhat to its own credit, has started to increase wages for its employees, at least in the States.[2] While Walmart has grown with the number of locations it operates, it has become harder for it to find employees to operate the locations.

As you can see, a large proportion of Walmart’s decisions are financially based. Of the 4 value propositions (low price, customer experience, product leadership, and quality), Walmart is competitimg with the proposition that many consider to be the weakest to defend. It should be noted that of the largest companies in the world. Walmart stands out as being possibly the only company that competes fundamentally on price to the consumer.

Has the value proposition undertaken at Walmart starting to hurt the giant? It is widely known that its suppliers are expected to decrease their unit costs over a set period of time.  Has that sponge been squeezed dry? With prices going up at other retailers, do this allow Walmart some availability to also increase their prices?

I recently read an article (you can find it here) stating that this could be the beginning of the end for Walmart. I see this as a small reorganization of the company. Walmart has closed stores in 2013 and has actually abandoned Germany as a market.

What are your thoughts on the Walmart store closures? Is this the beginning of the end?

Have an awesome week.

Kevin

Kevin MacDonald is a Business Consultant at L6S Business Consulting Inc (www.L6SBC.ca). L6S offers services in management consulting, Controller and CFO contracting, and lean management with either project work or teaching/mentoring of staff. Kevin has his CMA accounting designation along with a Black Belt in Lean Six Sigma.

Kevin is active in the community by volunteering for different groups and donates platelets at the Canadian Blood Services clinic on a bi-weekly basis.

For help with your business, contact Kevin at kevin@L6SBC.ca or 780-868-1867

[1] http://news.walmart.com/news-archive/2016/01/15/walmart-continues-sharpened-focus-on-portfolio-management

[2] http://www.wsj.com/articles/wal-mart-to-increase-wages-for-most-u-s-store-workers-1453315937

Final Review and New Goals

New-Year-Celebrations-in-India

At this time last year, you are commonly asked to develop goals which are aligned with your vision as a person and your company. During the last year, you have been hopefully reviewing your past goals.

Which goals were you successful in achieving? Where did you fall short? Do you see anything in common with the goals that were successful?

I was able to achieve some, but not all, of my goals for the year. With each goal achieved, I was able to give myself the pre-planned award.  If you are not rewarding yourself for achieving your goals, why are you trying to achieve them?

Since it is the time of year where people will ask you what your New Year’s resolution is going to be, tell them that you have set a number of goals. With each goal, have stepping stones in places to monitor your progress throughout the year. Also lay out a plan on how you are going to achieve those goals.

The plan that you lay out will help to keep yourself accountable. There is no point of setting goals for yourself if you have no intention or desire to achieve them. In essence, you might as well be on a boat with no rudder.

boat-rudderless

When setting your goals, don’t forget to make them SMART.

Specific: Be as granular as you can. A goal of making one new connection per month is better than the general statement of ‘improving the business’.

Measureable: How are you going to track your success? You can have a chart where you can note the name of each new connection made per month.

Actionable: Do you have the resources to do it? Are you able to go to networking events and are comfortable to meet new people?

Realistic: Based off your resources and conversations with other, is this something that you can do?

Time-bound: The goal is to meet one new connection…per month over the next year.

Business owners have a vision set out for their company into the future. The goals that you set for your company should be aligned towards that vision and allow you to reach your vision.

I won’t have a blog for the next two week. Enjoy your holiday season and the downtime with your family. Merry Christmas and Happy New Years!

Have an awesome week.

Kevin

Kevin MacDonald is a Business Consultant at L6S Business Consulting Inc (www.L6SBC.ca). L6S offers services in management consulting, Controller and CFO contracting, and lean management with either project work or teaching/mentoring of staff. Kevin has his CMA accounting designation along with a Black Belt in Lean Six Sigma.

Kevin is active in the community by volunteering for different groups and donates platelets at the Canadian Blood Services clinic on a bi-weekly basis.

Living in the Moment

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A few weeks ago, myself and a large number of CFL (Canadian Football League) fans did our yearly pilgrimage to watch the Grey Cup Championship Game. I will admit, there were some nerve racking moments but I am very happy that my team was able to win the 103rd Grey Cup Championship game.

During various moments of the game, you could see hundreds of cell phones taking pictures and videos. I will admit, I did take some video and pictures, but I kept reminding myself, “live in the moment”.

At this point, I decide to put my cell phone away and just take in what was happening.  I found myself enjoying the moment more. I was able to focus on the activities in front of me, instead of wondering if I will have enough battery left, playing with the camera focus, or making sure I got the angle I was looking for.

In the end, those moments that I had with my cell phone in my pocket are the moments that I remember the most. They are the most vivid and most replayed in my mind.

 

I will admit, I have taken my cell phone out for pictures since then, but all of the pictures were used in social media postings. None of the pictures are to be used as keep sake or as a memory of the event. As a matter of fact, they get deleted once they are posted. All I have left from those events is the energy of the crowd around me, the noise being made, and the sense of happiness for being there.

Have an awesome week.

Kevin

Kevin MacDonald is a Business Consultant at L6S Business Consulting Inc (www.L6SBC.ca). L6S offers services in management consulting, Controller and CFO contracting, and lean management with either project work or teaching/mentoring of staff. Kevin has his CMA accounting designation along with a Black Belt in Lean Six Sigma.

Kevin is active in the community by volunteering for different groups and donates platelets at the Canadian Blood Services clinic on a bi-weekly basis.

Photo Credit: http://www.countryliving.com/life/a36502/just-wait-until-you-spot-the-best-part-of-this-photo/?src=spr_FBPAGE&spr_id=1453_248145130